Malamute Care Tips

HOUSE BREAKING

All dogs can be housebroken if you are consistent, as well as persistent, in training them. There are two basic housebreaking techniques: crate training and paper training. Crate training is preferred by KingFisher’s Malamutes because it teaches direct housebreaking. Paper training can be an intermediate step, unless you deliberately want your dog to continue eliminating in a designated place indoors.  Be forgiving with a young puppy, and understand that until your puppy is 4-6 months old they man not have full bladder control.

Crate training: When indoors, keep your dog in the crate or under very close supervision. Take your dog out frequently, and give your dog lots of praise for relieving itself. It won’t be long before your dog gets the concept of only eliminating outdoors.  (This is what we do, here at KingFisher’s Malamutes)

Paper training: Cover the entire floor of a confined space with paper. Wait for your dog to use the paper, then replace the soiled paper. Once your dog seems to understand the paper concept, begin to leave a bare area without paper. The goal is to have only a very small area covered with paper.

KEEPING YOUR DOG’S TEETH CLEAN CAN HELP KEEP HIM HEALTHY!

Like your teeth, a dog’s teeth need daily care to remain healthy and strong. One way to prevent your dog from getting tooth decay or oral disease is to brush his teeth daily with a toothpaste and toothbrush designed especially for dogs.

Many dogs as young as age 3 may already show some form of oral disease. If left untreated, bacteria from the teeth and gums can cause serious health problems. Visit your veterinarian regularly, especially if you see signs of possible oral disease, such as bad breath, yellow-brown crust around the gum line, pawing at the mouth, change of chewing or eating habits, subdued behavior, excessive dribbling, bleeding gums, pain when eating or tooth loss.

Although dog biscuits and bones may have some benefit, they do not prevent the buildup of plaque and tartar. This is why it is so important to brush your dog’s teeth regularly. The teeth should be brushed at least once or twice a week. As with grooming, this will be easier if accustom your dog early in life.  PREVENTION IS THE BEST MEDICINE!

TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE VET

Establishing routine health care from an early age can prevent disease, prolong the life of your dog and improve your dog’s quality of life.

Picking a Veterinarian: It is extremely important to find someone you trust. If you are unfamiliar with the veterinarians in your area, use word-of-mouth to start your search. If  the veterinarian’s personality makes you uncomfortable, hindering your ability to ex- plain your concerns, find another one.

Vaccinations: Some of the most common vaccinations produce immunity to distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza. Puppies receive a series of these shots until they reach the proper degree of immunity, around three or four months old. Your dog will require annual booster shots. Your dog will also need regular rabies shots.

Parasites: Gastrointestinal parasites are common in puppies. They are easy to treat if caught promptly. Left untreated, they can cause serious harm. Your vet may ask you to submit stool samples from your dog during routine visits to keep these parasites in check.

Another common parasite is heartworm. The heartworm gains entry through the bite of an infected mosquito. Heartworms can be life-threatening if left untreated. Veterinarians usually dispense preventative drugs when- ever mosquitoes are active. A heartworm test must precede the medication.

Spay/Neuter: Spaying (for females) or neutering (for males) is a surgical procedure that makes your dog unable to reproduce. If you don’t plan to breed your dog or compete in the show ring, you should strongly consider spaying/neutering your dog. There are many benefits to spaying/neutering including preventing unwanted litters and overall health. Discuss your options with your veterinarian.

EXERCISE

Your dog needs regular exercise to stay fit and healthy. The amount of exercise your dog needs depends on its age, health, breed and temperament. Consider playing fetch, swimming or hiking. Activities you and your dog enjoy regularly are the best.  To a malamute exercise is the 2nd most important thing, 1st being its “pack”.

DON’T LEAVE YOUR DOG IN A HOT CAR!

When it’s only 80 degrees outside, a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes. In that kind of heat, a dog could easily die. That’s why the American Kennel Club recommends that dog owners never leave their dog alone in a car during warm weather.

For additional tips on canine summer care, request AKC’s Canine Summer Safety Tips by contacting Customer Service at (919) 233-9767 or orderdesk@akc.org.

www.akc.org

 

PLANTS CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR DOGS HEALTH!

Did you know that eating certain plants could make your dog sick or worse? Be aware of plants that are within reach of your dog. Listed below are some plants that can be harmful to your dog.
(list provided by AKC, www.akc.org)

May cause vomiting and diarrhea:

Castor bean
Soap berry
Ground Cherry
Skunk Cabbage
Daffodil
Delphinium
Foxglove
Larkspur
Indian Tobacco
IndianTurnip
Poke weed
Bittersweet woody
Wisteria

May cause vomiting, abdominal pain and/or diarrhea:

Almond
Apricot
Wild Cherry
Balsam Pear
Japanese Plum
Bird of Paradise bush
Horse Chestnut (Buckeye)
English Holly
Black Locust
Mock Orange
Privet
Rain  Tree (Monkey Pod)
American Yew
EnglishYew
Western Yew

May cause varied reactions:
Azalea
Philodendron
Hydrangea
Kalanchoe
Lilies
Mescal bean
Mushrooms (if also toxic to humans)
Sunburned potatoes
Rhubarb
Spinach
Tomato vine
Buttercup
Dologeton
Poison Hemlock
Water Hemlock
Jasmine
Loco weed
Lupine
Matrimony Vine
May Apple
Moonseed
Nightshade
Angel’s Trumpet

May act as hallucinogens:
Marijuana
Morning Glory
Nutmeg
Perriwinkle
Peyote

May cause convulsions:
China berry
Coriaria
Moonweed
Nux vomica
Water Hemlock

 

IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY:

Who would take care of your dog if you were hurt and unable to do so? To make sure vital information regarding your dog is easily accessible to others, take a few moments to fill out an emergency information sheet.

List two or three people as contacts in case of emergency. Include the contact’s name, address, and telephone number. Make sure at least one of the contacts has a set of your house keys.

You may also want your attorney to draft a written statement, which gives immediate custody of your dog to a designated individual with that individual’s consent. Notify that individual of his or her responsibility, and put his or her name, address, and phone number on your emergency information sheet.

Attach a recent photo of your dog to the information sheet to help others locate your dog if it should wander off.

Put the information sheet on your refrigerator or other prominent spot in your house. You may also want to keep similar information in your wallet. If you are unable to care for your dog due to an accident or emergency, someone will be able to follow the instructions on the sheet to provide necessary care.

 

WHY DO DOGS BARK?

Dogs bark to communicate.

Dogs, like people, are social animals. Scolding or yelling at your dog when it barks will not make it stop. In fact, your dog may interpret your yelling as participation in the “conversation.”

Dogs bark out of boredom.

A dog that is frustrated or bored may bark just for something to do.

Dogs bark to get attention.

Because they are social animals, dogs crave attention. If the only attention a dog receives is punishment for barking, it will bark to receive even that attention.

How can I keep my dog from barking excessively?

Train your dog to bark only when appropriate.

Interrupt inappropriate barking by distracting the dog. Drop a plastic soda bottle full of pennies or rocks somewhere near it. When it stops barking, praise it in a pleasant voice by saying “Good dog, that’s enough.”

Spend time playing with your dog everyday.

Dogs that do not get enough interaction with people are more likely to bark out of boredom or to seek attention.

Give your dog chews and toys.

Keep your dog occupied when you can’t be home.  You can prevent nuisance barking before it starts by making sure your dog is happy, healthy and well-trained. Contact a dog club in your area for information about training opportunities.